SIU DUN
SIU DUN
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archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.
Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.
[via Lost At E Minor]
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huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
huffingtonpost:

IKEA ADVERTISES ADOPTABLE DOGS IN STORES, BECAUSE EVERY HOME NEEDS A RESCUE PUP
The idea to display the pets inside the store started in Singapore as a collaboration between Ikea and two animal shelters, according to Business Insider. Together they formed the project Home for Hope.
Find out which state in the United States will be adopting rescue pet displays in Ikea stores here.
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homedesigning:

Wooden Kitchen Cabinets
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homedesigning:

(via Ultra Sleek Private Home with Incredible Architecture)
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asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.
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Tove Jansson drawing Moomintroll

Tove Jansson drawing Moomintroll
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archatlas:

Vivienda en Coirós Bals Arquitectos
archatlas:

Vivienda en Coirós Bals Arquitectos
archatlas:

Vivienda en Coirós Bals Arquitectos
archatlas:

Vivienda en Coirós Bals Arquitectos
archatlas:

Vivienda en Coirós Bals Arquitectos
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